Most People consider Trump was at the least partially chargeable for Reuters’ assault on the Capitol

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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: US President Donald Trump holds a rally to challenge US Congress certification of 2020 US presidential election results in Washington

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By Chris Kahn

(Reuters) – Seventy-one percent of American adults, including nearly half of all Republicans, believe that former President Donald Trump was at least partially responsible for the start of the deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, according to an Ipsos poll conducted for Reuters was responsible.

However, the national online poll released on Saturday also found that a smaller fraction – only about half of the country – believe Trump should be convicted or banned from public office for insurrection during his impeachment trial in the Senate.

The survey of 998 adults, conducted after Trump’s attorneys completed their presentation in the trial on Friday, found how many Americans balance what they understand as Trump’s role in the attack with what he deserves in response .

When asked what they think of Trump’s role, 30% of Americans said he was “fully” responsible for sparking the violent confrontation between police and Trump loyalists that broke into Congress in the hope that the Prevent lawmakers from confirming the results of the November 2020 presidential election.

Another 25% said they were largely responsible, 16% said they were partially responsible, and the remaining 29% said Trump was not responsible at all for the attack that killed five people.

While Democrats were far more likely than Republicans to blame Trump for the attack, nearly half of Republicans agreed that Trump was at least “partially” responsible.

When asked what the Senate should do in response, a smaller section of the country, including a smaller percentage of Democrats and Republicans, said they would even condemn Trump for insurrection.

Fifty percent of respondents said they would condemn Trump if they got a vote. Another 38% said Trump shouldn’t be convicted and 12% said they weren’t sure.

Fifty-three percent said Trump should be prevented from holding public office again, while 39 percent said he should be allowed to.

The impeachment proceedings against the Senate should be completed on Saturday. A conviction requires a two-thirds majority, which means that at least 17 Republicans in the 100-seat chamber would have to join all 50 Democrats in order to find Trump guilty. That seemed unlikely.

Trump’s attorneys say Trump had no intention of causing a riot in the Capitol and that he was exercising his constitutional right to freedom of expression when addressing his supporters.

Approximately 73% of respondents said they made a decision before the Senate trial began whether or not to convict Trump, and the other 27% made their choice during the trial.

The Ipsos survey was conducted in the US in English. Responses were collected from 998 adults between the ages of 18 and 65, and the survey sample was weighted using the latest population estimates to better reflect the American public. The results have a confidence interval, a measure of accuracy, of 4 percentage points.

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